CHAPTER EIGHT

Vitvan was 34 years old when he left Mozumdar. He was fully aware of the significance of his achievement but he was not misled by his accomplishment.

"Once the power in the sacral center is awakened (Kundalini)," he writes in his The Natural Order Process: Basic Teachings of the School of the Natural Order, "it rises immediately to the crown center at the top of the head and, uniting with the force of the pituitary center, develops that greater faculty known as perceptive insight or intuitive perception. While this is much to be desired, it is only the beginning. One starts to function on Mind level, but that is the lowest of Light's Regions. There is more--ever more.

"One time I asked my teacher, 'Have you known anyone or heard of anyone who has reached the ultimate state?'

"He told me that the highest ones in development, those in orientation to the highest wave-frequency levels that his own teacher, Arumda, had ever contacted had said that they did not know the ultimate heights. 'It goes beyond anything they could register or even contact; it is illimitable.'

"My own consciousness was now integrated to the causal level of Noetic Mind, but I was newly born to this awareness. My task was to serve as teacher to any others who might also aspire to that Light. And by so doing, center myself in this state of consciousness and continue my own development."

For the next thirty years Vitvan traveled throughout the United States, Canada and Cuba, teaching and writing a curriculum to explain the understanding he had achieved.

"Depending," he wrote, "on how you want your applesauce served, I refer to those three decades in Vedic terms as my 'Sannyasin Period' or, more American style, as my years as an itinerant preacher. Whatever label appeals, I wandered here and there and back again teaching wherever I could find an audience and taking upon myself those rare few who were ready to dedicate themselves to the Ancient Wisdom."

Vitvan's first destination when he left Mozumdar was New York City.

"I decided," he wrote, "that it would be in my best interest to put the continent between me and my teacher. To remain close to him would be a constant temptation. After seven long years of being outside the dimension of his insights, I now shared that common ground of enlightenment. It was a special kind of fraternity. And it was strong inducement to remain near him, rejoicing in our brotherhood. But if I were to serve my own dharma I must do it alone. I boarded the train, sorrowful at our parting, but thrilled with the expectation of things to come."

next Chapter 9